ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: DC Kash

DC Kash’s music career begun after hearing a hit song on the radio while riding in the car with his mom. He didn’t like it, so his mom challenged him to do better. A few years later, he was a battle-rapping middle schooler. By high school, he had released his first mixtape. Now 24, the D.C. native primarily speaks for the youth, the elderly, the poverty-stricken, and the disabled. A voice for forgotten people, DC Kash uses his own experiences and those of people he comes in contact with to create art. An advocate for the underdog, his message is clear –we’re still here.

Growing up, DC Kash listened to — and was inspired by — Tupac and Bob Marley. Coupled with the stylings of current artists like J Cole and Kendrick Lamar, DC Kash has come to truly believe he can spark the change he wants to see. To that end, he released his project, ProGress, at the top of the year. At the time, DC Kash was rebounding from a house fire and welcoming a new baby. Challenges aside, he completed his album, performed at the Howard Theatre, and his song –“Sorry Bout Your Luck”–was featured in the movie Boss. Different than most of his songs, “Sorry Bout Your Luck” has trap vibes and displays DC Kash’s competitive nature.

This month, Boss II premieres, and DC Kash will be making a cameo. With childhood dreams coming true, DC Kash looks forward to further promoting ProGress and shooting a few videos for songs off the project. He’s also started working on his next project, Passion over Poverty, and is looking forward to collaborating with other artists that complement his art.’

A real person who works two jobs to take care of his two kids, all DC Kash needs is a shot. He wants the opportunity to compete, and wants people to listen to his music and see him perform with raw vocals. Most of all, he wants to snag that signing bonus and use it to uplift his city. D.C. is more than its newfound glam –there’s still homelessness in close proximity to the White House. As he raps about – and lives – life, he contends that the afterlife and how you are remembered are what matter most.

To connect with DC Kash, follow him on Instagram and Twitter. Check out his music on iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud, and Tidal.

 

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